Jim McCarty, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                              Chronic Fatigue

www.drmccarty.com   720-200-9317

 

Notice: This notice is being included to educate the reader and increase their understanding of Chiropractic. In today’s world, potential Chiropractic patients are doing their homework and becoming as well informed as possible before choosing which type of provider to access for their care. Many potential Chiropractic patients have already visited their primary care provider and are looking for an alternative to the drug and surgery options.

     The time has come for each and every one of us to stop being willfully ignorant and step up to a higher level of knowledge and understanding as to the role of Chiropractic medicine that is within the scope of Chiropractic.

     Increasing your knowledge and understanding of Chiropractic is essential to avoid being misled and deceived by those health care providers, insurance providers, and government agencies who earn a living off of your fear and ignorance. Today’s educated consumer must do his/her due diligence and raise his/her level of understanding regarding their condition to a higher standard so that they can take responsibility for their health and well being.

     I am a Chiropractor. The Scope of Practice includes examination, analyzation, evaluation, adjustment, and manipulation of the Musculo-Skeletal system and the Subluxation Complex in the human body.

     The Musculo-skeletal system includes the bones, muscles, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, joints, and other connective tissue {such as the fascia} that supports and binds the tissues and organs together.

     A subluxation complex is a neuro-musculo-skeletal condition that involves an aberrant relationship between two adjacent bones. This aberrant relationship consists of some form of compression and rotation between the two adjacent bones which may cause muscle spasms, structural pathology, functional pathology, or other abnormality of the system affecting balance, coordination, or muscle strength. It does this through the muscles, bones, nerves, and fascia.

     The role of the Chiropractor includes determining the existence of, the nature of, the severity of, the effects of, and complicating factors that affect this musculo-skeletal system/subluxation complex. This includes determining the existence of structural pathology, functional pathology, and/or other abnormality of the system followed up by the treatment of those conditions.

     The role of the Doctor of Chiropractic includes the manipulation and adjustment of those two adjacent bones which are either too close to each other or too far from each other, or rotated in their relationship to each other. These subluxation complexes may cause functional pathology. The goal is to improve, correct, and optimize the biomechanical condition of the musculo-skeletal system/subluxation complex. This in turn improves, corrects, and optimizes the structure, function, and other abnormalities. This, thereby, of necessity, reduces muscle spasms and improves the coordination, balance, efficiency, strength, conditioning, and functional health and integrity of the system.

Thank You for coming to our site. 

My treatment for Chronic Fatigue involves examining the patient for subluxation complexes in the spine and skull and then treating tem appropriately using Chiropractic manipulation and adjustments.

We have a 80% success rate correcting Chronic Fatigue within 12 months.

AFTER reading the "Frequently Asked Questions" page (at the bottom of the TMJ page) feel free to drop us an e-mail with any medical questions that you have at info@drmccarty.com .  

 Sincerely,                                                                Hit Counter

Dr. Jim McCarty, D.C.                     Visitors to this Site since 02-20-2002    

Please contact me and we'll talk about what is going on with you.

 

I look forward to speaking with you!  720-200-9317

 

Video #1:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=808xSSLN8Vw  

 

Video #1.2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt1VzPxi-8E

 

Video #2 A: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayzzG8M0fzo

 

Video #2 .2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cPJI0Egpsg

 

Video #2.3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq0XKSm0B08

 

Video #2.4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdcEzQgc8fI

 

Video #2.5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bX678q6Itq4

 

Video #2.6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DvbTtgxAT8

 

Video #3:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8w91KGW-dA

 

Video #4:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NkwUQiPKR4

 

Video #5:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErTB42gSjSo

 

Video #6:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnYSqzc_YQE

John 10:10   I have come that they might have life and that they might have it more abundantly.

{This refers to Jesus who is alive. He loves the little children and is coming back soon.}

www.aldomcphereson.com        WWW.HeavenIsForReal.com      www.Jesushp.net

 

 

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Dr. McCarty, D.C. does not do surgery!  He removes the pressure on the subluxation complexes that are affecting the brain and the brainstem NON-Surgically.  Read more about his treatments by going to the TMJ page.

 This article is for the readers education as to what research is being done by the medical profession.

This article is about medical surgery and is NOT a treatment offered by Dr. Jim McCarty, D.C.

THURSDAY  NOVEMBER 11, 1999

                  WALL STREET JOURNAL

                             High Hopes

Surgery on the Skull For Chronic Fatigue?

                 Doctors Are Trying It

                A Bit More Room for the Brain

                             By THOMAS M. BURTON

            Staff Reporter of The WALL STREET JOURNAL

 CHICAGO Jozan Plaza, a 45-year-old Alabama woman, visited Chicago recently to have part of the back of her skull drilled off.

Was this a good idea?

Ms. Plaza is among the roughly eight million Americans diagnosed with a condi­tion called fibromyalgia syndrome, which involves widespread muscle pain, sleep­lessness, fatigue and depression. It is poorly understood and controversial. Many doctors aren’t convinced it is a disease at all, suspecting that in some patients it is really depression with physi­cal manifestations.

Patients .who are told they have fibro­myalgia or the closely related chronic fatigue syndrome are usually just pre­scribed sleeping pills, antidepressants, and physical therapy. Treating patients with these diagnoses, in short, - isn’t brain surgery. Except that at a handful of American hospitals, it now is.

Spinal Tap

A new belief among a few neurosurgeons is that these patients' troubles can stem from a squeezing of the brain or spinal cord by a too-tight skull or spinal canal. For about $30,000 a case, they are drilling and snipping away bone from the backs of people’s skulls to ""decompress” their brains, spinal cords and central nervous systems.

               This is like telling the story of the discovery of insulin,” says Ms. Plaza’s Chicago surgeon, Dan S Heffez. “You’re talking about a completely new insight about a condition that has baffled people since the beginning of the modern world.” He and two other doctors, one in Baltimore and one who recently moved to North Carolina, have operated on hundreds of such patients in all.

But other prominent doctors are aghast that such complicated and potentially dan­gerous operations are being offered to pa­tients diagnosed with conditions they re­gard as primarily psychiatric in some instances. “Is this on a par with insulin? Not on your life,” says Peter Carmel, neurosurgery chairman at New Jersey Medical School in Newark and an authority on the skull malformations at issue. “Would I offer a patient an operation the way they do? No.”

Neurological Difficulties

Surgery proponents contend that these patients, mostly women, have been ig­nored or ridiculed by much of the medical profession, and as a result often don’t get proper neurological exams and diagnoses. These proponents say the problem facing many such patients is a congenital skull malformation long recognized as causing, neurological difficulties in a small number of people. It is called “posterior fossa compression” or, in-a reference to the doctor who identified it, a Chiari malfor­mation. The other condition that surgery proponents point to is a too-narrow spinal canal, called “cervical spinal stenosis.”

This is what they are operating for, the surgeons say; they reject the notion that they use surgery to treat chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia.

But Dan Clauw, a rheumatologist, at Georgetown University in Washington, contends that only an “extremely low percentage” of chronic-fatigue and fibromyalgia cases have such a neurological basis. He says his research group did magnetic resonance imaging of the skull and spine in 28 fibromyalgia patients and 14 other people and found “no difference in the MRIs between the fibromyalgia group and the control group.” At the very least, he says, a controlled clinical trial should be done before subjecting hundreds of pa­tients to highly invasive surgery.

The pioneer of the surgery, Michael J. Rosner, says that he plans to publish a -medical-journal article on the topic. “Unless you’re looking for this or you have a high degree of suspicion, you say there is nothing wrong with the patient,” he says. “I don’t operate on somebody who doesn’t have an abnormal exam.

A case that proved a big spur to his surgery involved a patient .who was him­self a doctor. Sam Banner, a family practi­tioner with a storefront office in Dothan, Ala., was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome in 1989. He found himself so weak and tired he could no longer practice medicine, so he took a desk job reviewing workers’ compensation claims for a local manufacturer. In that job, he noticed that lots of spine and skull surgery was being done by Dr. Rosner at the University of Alabama in Birmingham.

The purpose was to alleviate pressure on the lower part of the hind-brain, known as cerebellar tonsils. It is well established that these organs can be packed too tightly and that, in rare cases, this causes neuro­logical problems: patients may have se­vere pain or numbness in the arms, severe difficulty concentrating, or wildly exag­gerated reflexes and a wobbly gait.

Dr. Rosner, a prominent surgeon who had already helped transform accepted treatment of head trauma, began doing skull surgery on patients who didn’t meet classic definitions. For instance, he con­cluded that the cerebellar tonsils didn’t need to be forced several millimeters below the base of the skull to cause trouble, but could do so just by squeezing against the spinal cord.

Dr. Banner implored Dr. Rosner to do an MRI on him. Dr. Rosner did, concluding Dr. Banner had a too-tight spine that squeezed his spinal cord. On learning there might be a physical cause for his problem, says Dr. Banner, “I went to the chapel at the university and got down on my hands and knees and thanked God.”

Dr. Rosner did a spinal operation called a laminectomy in 1995, and afterward, Dr. Banner, feeling very much better, became. something of a crusader. He named his of­fice the Nathanael Medical Center— “Nathanael” translates loosely from He­brew as “gift from God”—made fibromyal­gia and chronic-fatigue a part of his prac­tice, and organized a support group for sufferers. He took out newspaper and Inter­net ads telling sufferers there might be hope for their hitherto intractable conditions.

Many people who came to him had been seen many times by rheumatologists, neu­rologists, radiologists and assorted other -ologists. “If you go into a doctor’s office and tell them you’re tired or you hurt all over, they don’t want to hear about it,” Dr. Banner says. When such people were ex­amined, he says, 50% to 80% turned out to have cranial or spinal malformations.

He began referring them to Dr. Rosner, who says he operated on about 90 of about 300 patients sent. Insurance generally cov­ered the surgery because Dr. Rosner didn’t diagnose their problems as fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome; he regarded them as having Chiari malformations or cervical spinal stenosis.

Several of Dr. Rosner’s patients say they were disabled and miserable beforehand; even unable to walk, and dramatically im­proved afterward. Stephanie B. Ash. who had been diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, says she saw Dr. Banner on a local TV show and got far better after surgery. “The Lord led me to watch television that morning,” says the Dothan resident.

Not everybody was so thrilled. Four pa­tients sued Drs. Banner and Rosner and the University of Alabama at Birmingham health-services foundation, claiming un­necessary surgery was done on them at UAB. Some asserted, in Houston County, Ala., Circuit Court, that their symptoms had worsened. One said she developed meningitis.

Doctors complained, too. Other doctors in Dothan who saw some of these same pa­tients before and after surgery concluded that some operations were unnecessary and unhelpful.

Cases

One such doctor is D. Bruce Woodham, a neurosurgeon who saw a patient, Donna McCord, in 1996 after surgery by Dr. Ros­ner. Dr. Woodham wrote to Dr. Rosner that Ms. McCord was doing poorly.

“I would consider her a failure in her se­ries as she has exactly the same symptomology  she had prior to her surgery and now she is on disability,” he wrote. “The patient states that her life is a wreck... she states that she is really not any better off.” Law­suits by Ms. McCord and two other patients against UAB and Dr. Rosner have been settled; Dr. Banner won summary judgement in the three patients’ suits against him. The fourth suit was withdrawn.

Three years ago, Dr. Woodham wrote a letter, signed by 13 other Dothan doctors, to UAB’s neurosurgery chairman expressing concern about an “inordinately high” number of operations for hind-brain com­pression. The doctors said that they had seen many of the patients Dr. Banner re­ferred to Dr. Rosner for surgery-and that their exam results were normal. “These patients are desperate people, eager to ob­tain any sort of relief that might be offered them,” Dr. Woodham’s letter said. “They, I feel, are easy prey to someone who offers them a quick fix for a problem that does not have a quick fix.”

UAB’s neurosurgery chairman, Richard Morawetz, confronted Dr. Rosner and. tried to get him to leave the faculty, contending - he was doing unnecessary surgery, according to people familiar ‘with the events. They add that Dr. Rosner asked for an internal medical panel to investi­gate, and that a panel member asked him how much money it would take for him to leave the university. A settlement was reached, and Dr. Rosner left UAB..

Clearly, however, sentiment at UAB against the surgery wasn’t unanimous. Some former colleagues of Dr. Rosner at UAB published an abstract of work that, Dr. Rosner claims, sought credit for what were his ideas and work. That abstract concluded that a Chiari malformation—a too-tight skull—could contribute to fibromyalgia symptoms. Dr. Rosner describes the events at UAB as “thieving, lying, backstabbing and power plays.” UAB says a peer-review panel found there was no misconduct on the part of any of the researchers.

Some doctors now face litigation from Dr. Banner. He has alleged defamation by Dr. Woodham and the co-signers of his let­ter, and he has accused Dr. Morawetz and two UAB colleagues of hurting his medical practice by criticizing his diagnoses. A UAB spokesman declines to comment, but a lawyer for the defendants says they deny all the suit’s allegations. It is pending in Jefferson County, Ala., Circuit Court.

Dr. Rosner now does surgery at Park Ridge Hospital in Fletcher, N.C. Dr. Ban­ner still refers patients to him, and also sends some, such as Ms. Plaza, to Dr. Hef­fez, who is at the Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery & Neuroresearch.

And Dr. Rosner has won, a few other converts in the medical world. A rheumatologist at the University of Wisconsin, Daniel Malone, was persuaded by a talk Dr. Rosner gave at a medical conference and has begun referring patients to Dr. Heffez in Chicago. A doctor at Johns Hop­kins Hospital in Baltimore, Peter C. Rowe, also heard Dr. Rosner speak and has since sent_patients to him, to Dr. Heffez and to the third doctor who does this kind of surgery, John D. Weingart at Johns Hop­kins. Dr. Weingart and Dr. Heffez have done about 75 of these surgeries, and Dr. Rosner an estimated 250.

All of which greatly concerns many oth­ers in medicine. Contending that this group of patients could be one particularly susceptible to a placebo effect, the critics complain that the surgery is being done without a rigorous effort to compare surgery patients’ outcomes with others’. “My feeling is that Rosner and Heffez are moving way too rapidly,” says George­town’s Dr. Clauw. Though he agrees that some fibromyalgia and chronic-fatigue pa­tients probably have brain or spine com­pressions, “my view is that it’s an ex­tremely low percentage.”

The government doesn’t require clinical trials for new surgical techniques, but many hospitals have internal review boards to scrutinize them. Dr. Heffez sees no rea­son for any hospital to do an internal review of such surgery because, he says, it Is “standard treatment for a standard neuro­logical problem that has gone undiag­nosed.” Dr. Heffez plans to publish his results, which he says have included improve­ment by 100% of the patients who suffered from disorientation, dizziness or diffuse pain, and by 95% of those with insomnia.

Word already is getting around. The Na­tional Fibromyalgia Research Association’s Web site has publicized the technique, and word is spreading from people who have had the surgery and are happy with it.

Ms. Plaza, for one, feels hers was a ter­rific idea. Before the four-hour operation, she says, she had headaches, blurred vi­sion and fatigue “so powerful I had to lean against the wall.” Now, she says, many of these symptoms have abated so much that “I feel like I could conquer the world.”

ALTERNATIVES TO SURGERY

Neuro Cranial Reconstruction

Magnesium Citrate

Apple Cider Vinegar

Cayenne Pepper  

 

                

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